Choosenick. Notes and observations on service design, as well as other interesting things/thinking. By Nick Marsh.



Archive of October 2007


15816498_500.jpg I saw this screen quite a lot
October 16th, 2007 / Trackback / Comments

15816459_500.jpg The Bike Stand outside the Barbican with a partcipant setting off
October 16th, 2007 / Trackback / Comments

Fresh thinking that creates value
— I’ve had this answer to ‘what is innovation’ going round and round my head since I read this over the weekend. Very clever, very good. Now, having addressed the second toughest definition, maybe they’d consider answering the real biggie - What is design?
October 16th, 2007 / Trackback / Comments



Interesting diagram that circuitously shows the need for better service design

Scott Weisbrod from Critical Mass put me on to this interesting digram on the need for a review of the traditional marketing funnel from Forrester research:

As they say:

“Engagement goes beyond reach and frequency to measure people’s real feelings about brands. It starts with their own brand relationship and continues as they extend that relationship to other customers. As a customer’s participation with a brand deepens from site use and purchases (involvement and interaction) to affinity and championing (intimacy and influence), measuring and acting on engagement becomes more critical to understanding customers’ intentions. The four parts of engagement build on each other to make a holistic picture.”

Still (as always) relentlessly blinkered to thinking about online, but insightful and thought provoking nonetheless.

October 15th, 2007 / Trackback / Comments

Vast report on Innovation in the Economist

 

“Innovation, long the preserve of technocratic elites, is becoming more open. This will be good for the world, argues Vijay Vaitheeswaran.”

I’m reading this offline right now…

Link 

October 13th, 2007 / Trackback / Comments

Strategy at the heart of government

 

A great set of ideas and thoughts on the role of strategic thinking in policy making processes from the cabinet office strategy team. As with so much from government, it looks awful which means no-one will read it, but if you dig down, there’s some very interesting stuff.

http://interactive.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/strategy/survivalguide/ 

October 13th, 2007 / Trackback / Comments

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.
— Theodore Roosevelt - via
October 13th, 2007 / Trackback / Comments

Article in Strategy and Business on 'making the most of customers'

Piece on the value of design led customer engagement - i.e being nice to people, listening to them and visiting them in their homes.

“We characterize companies that comprehend this as achieving customer advantage, because they have the capacity to leverage a deep understanding of how people absorb and assimilate products and services into their daily routines. The goal of customer advantage is to identify and develop innovations — products and services, new business models, go-to-market models, marketing programs, and service configurations — that fit into and change customers’ lives, are relevant to the everyday challenges customers face, and create transformational customer experiences.”

Making the Most of Customers

October 9th, 2007 / Trackback / Comments
Next » « Previous